Thursday, April 13, 2017

From sticks and bones, a house begins to emerge

"Tell me how does your light shine
In the halls of Shambala."

Our house in North Carolina was 24 percent complete as of March 31, according to an inspection report provided by our lender.



This is a view from the back of the house of the basement and beginning of the first floor. My studio is to the left. There will be sliding glass doors in the opening. To the right, the room with 8 window openings is the basement great room. There will be a similar living room above, and the dining room will be above the studio.


This is shot from the front toward the left side of the house. You can see two of the master bedroom windows and the master bathroom window. The open area in the foreground on the right is the beginning of our garage.

And a few more random photos. You guess is almost as good as mine.



It is getting really real.

I've been continuing to deal with it mostly by playing ostrich, but that time is coming to an end. Neil and I have gone through about 90 percent of the kitchen cabinets and culled a boatload of stuff to haul to goodwill, including at least 30 coffee mugs. We've also tackled the linen closet upstairs and gotten it down to a sensible number of sheets and towels.

I've gone as far as mentally assessing how much glass and beads I have and possible ways to safely pack them.

On a recent walk, these words came out of Neil's mouth. I think I'll stop playing softball when the next league ends in June until after we move. I said, who are you and what did you do with my husband?

After some reflection though, these words came out of my mouth. I have a trunk show the first weekend in June and after that I think I'll stop making beads until after we move.

My plan is to dismantle my studio and sell off some of the larger pieces of equipment, definitely the ventilation hood, maybe the kiln and oxygen concentrator and torch. Most of my equipment is almost 9 years old. It makes more sense to buy new equipment than to pay to move the old. Writing off the cost of new equipment in 2017 makes sense, since it is likely to be our highest tax year ever.

I love my torch but I don't use it to its full capacity. I rarely run the outer ring and the inner ring is a Cricket, which is the new torch I'd buy. I might as well sell off my boro. I always think I may want to play with it again but on any given day I never really feel like doing it. Boro is great for sculptural work, less so for beads, and beads are where my passion lies. People do make beads with boro but a different style which is more about heat chemistry and less about design. The colors can be magical but I love the versatility of soft glass.

I really don't need the heat of the four-stud Scorpion for the kind of lampwork I do.

I've been selling off some of my glass, although I have so much I'm barely making a dent, especially since at the same time I am still buying a little glass. New colors tempt me, as well as reasonable prices on older stock of some colors that are nicer than the current stock. It's just such a headache to ship glass. Beads are so easy to ship by comparison.

All of which begs the question of whether, if I made beads nonstop for the next ten years, I could turn the glass I currently own into beads.

I like having it though. I like knowing it is there. I like looking at it. I like pulling a rod of a go-to premium color such as opal yellow and knowing that I won't run out. I like owning a stash of colors that you can't buy today except at high prices on the secondary market if you happen to come across someone selling some.

Yeah, I know, my kids one day will donate it to a glass school or charity or give it away. But I can't worry about everything and I'm not dead yet.

And this just in - more house photos. Progress is running rampant now.


This is the front view, taken from the little park across the street, early in the morning. I love having morning light at the back of the house where the master bedroom, living areas and my studio will be.


This is taken from the front, to the left facing the house and our three car garage, with our master bathroom and bedroom windows toward the back.


View facting the house from the front and to the right.. The two windows on the right are the study, the windows above are a guest bedroom and the bonus room, where I will have my treadmill and a TV of my own.


And the back of the house again, with outdoor living (screened-in porch), living room and master box bay window on the main floor, more guest bedooms upstairs. I might make the back bedroom a sitting room, with a sleep sofa for guests. It's too nice a space to languish largely unused. The basement living room windows and box bay windows are not visible yet - but soon will be.

And with that, I'll leave you to contemplate (or not) my future digs and whether (or not) a house makes a home.


Wash away my troubles, wash away my pain
With the rain in Shambala
Wash away my sorrow, wash away my shame
With the rain in Shambala

Ah, ooh, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Ah, ooh, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

Everyone is helpful, everyone is kind
On the road to Shambala
Everyone is lucky, everyone is so kind
On the road to Shambala

How does your light shine
In the halls of Shambala
How does your light shine
In the halls of Shambala

I can tell my sister by the flowers in her eyes
On the road to Shambala
I can tell my brother by the flowers in his eyes
On the road to Shambala

How does your light shine
In the halls of Shambala
Tell me how does your light shine
In the halls of Shambala

Ah, ooh, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Ah, ooh, yeah
On the road to Shambala.

(Daniel Moore. Covered by Three Dog Night.)

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Thanks for your comment! I will post it as soon as I receive it. Liz